Annales de Limnologie - International Journal of Limnology

Annales de Limnologie - International Journal of Limnology publishes papers on the ecology of freshwater systems, ranging from studies of aquatic organisms, physical and chemical works which relate to the biological environment, to ecological applications and frameworks for water management directives.

Journal founded by University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse in 1964.

  • Feeding inhibition tests as a tool for seston quality evaluation in lentic ecosystems: salinization impact

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    Daphnia sp. feeding rate was affected by low NaCl concentrations and seston quality seems to be more important in their feeding rate performance than changes in water parameters. The here-obtained results showed that feeding inhibition tests has a sensible cost-effective methodology to assess the effects of abiotic stresses in freshwater ecosystems.

    Ann. Limnol. - Int. J. Lim., 55 (2019) 23
    Published online: 25 November 2019
  • Spatio-temporal distribution and species traits of water beetles along an oligotrophic hydrosystem: a case study

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    This study presents the first comprehensive investigation of water beetles in oligotrophic hydrosystems with tufa formation in southeastern Europe. Biological and ecological traits of so far poorly studied species are revealed.The results provide a basis for future investigations, and demonstrate the potential of Elmidae as water quality indicators in this region.

    Ann. Limnol. - Int. J. Lim., 55 (2019) 22
    Published online: 15 November 2019
  • Low cross-taxon congruence among aquatic organisms in artificial tropical ponds: implications for biomonitoring

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    We intended to choose an indicator group to better represent the biodiversity in man-made tropical ponds. For these propose we tested the congruence pattern among several aquatic communities. Two explanations have been previously proposed for the congruence among different taxa: (i) that different taxa have the same responses to environmental gradients (Padial et al., 2012a); or (ii) that congruence occurs because of ecological interactions among different groups, for instance, the relationships between predators and prey (Larsen et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the communities that depend directly on both water and land are likely more congruent with each other (e.g., amphibians, Odonata (in part), and macrophytes) than those that live in only one of these habitats (e.g., phytoplankton, aquatic insects, and birds). Although the congruency found for them was weak, amphibians were able to partially represent patterns in the abundance of Coleoptera, Heteroptera, and macrophytes. In terms of richness, macrophytes were able to partially represent patterns in Odonata, Coleoptera and birds. In this way, at least for abundance, our results partially supported the hypothesis that the biotic communities that depend directly on both water and land (e.g., amphibians and macrophytes) are more congruent with each other than those living only in one of these environments.Ultimately, we do not recommend the use of a single surrogate taxon to measure biodiversity: weak overall congruence between taxa; limited biological knowledge about tropical artificial ponds; and numerous taxa whose diversity patterns could not be represented by any surrogate group (phytoplankton, Heteroptera, and birds) illustrate the unsuitability of this approach.

    Ann. Limnol. - Int. J. Lim., 55 (2019) 21
    Published online: 15 November 2019
  • Open Access

    Relative effects of elevational and habitat constraints on alpine spring biodiversity

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    Benthic, vegetation and hyporheic invertebrates sampled in springs along an elevation gradient in the Chartreuse mountains decreased in taxonomic richness with elevation, while landscape and local characteristics had poor influence on their diversity but partly controlled their abundances.

    Ann. Limnol. - Int. J. Lim., 55 (2019) 20
    Published online: 15 November 2019
  • Open Access

    Movement patterns of juvenile and adult noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) in a small stream, determined by radiotelemetry

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    This first radiotelemetric study comparing summer movement patterns of juvenile and adult noble crayfish (Astacusastacus) found substantial differences between the two groups during the 24-h cycle. In addition, juveniles moved over significantly longer distances, predominantly upstream.

    Ann. Limnol. - Int. J. Lim., 55 (2019) 19
    Published online: 11 October 2019